aristonorganic

If you make a daily pot of coffee, you have a fabulous source of organic matter right at your fingertips. In compost jargon, coffee grounds are a “green,” meaning an item that is rich in nitrogen (yes, I know coffee grounds are brown. In your compost, they’re green. Trust me.) Coffee grounds are approximately 1.45% nitrogen. They also contain magnesium, calcium, potassium, and other trace minerals.

coffee

There are several ways you can put used coffee grounds to work in your garden:

  • Put coffee grounds in your compost bin. As noted above, they are a valuable source of nitrogen.
  • Add grounds directly to the soil in your garden. You can scratch it into the top couple inches of soil, or just sprinkle the grounds on top and leave it alone.
  • Create a slug and snail barrier. Coffee grounds are both abrasive and acidic, so a barrier of grounds placed near slug-prone…

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